3/23/15: Two Down, Two to Go

On Sunday an area of low pressure tracked across South Dakota through eastern Nebraska and eventually into northern Missouri.   That surface feature in combination with a strong upper-air disturbance (vorticity maximum) brought any where from 1 to 4 inches of snow along the North Dakota / South Dakota border, then heavier snow down the Minnesota River Valley corridor into southern Minnesota.  Some locations in south central and southeastern Minnesota recorded 7 to 11 inches of snow in a narrow band from the southwestern suburbs of the Twin Cities down to Rochester and other locations in the far southeastern corner of Minnesota.

Sunday through Monday AM Surface Animation.
Sunday through Monday AM Surface Animation.

 

Right behind and north of the first system was another area of low pressure that faded away as it approached Minot, yet, the upper-level disturbance (vorticity) remained in place and attributed to some snow north of Highway 2 especially from north central to northeastern North Dakota.   Cavalier for example recorded around 4 inches of snow from this event.  The snow has now exited the state and besides some flurries,  no more snow is expected today.  But tomorrow may be a different story especially in western North Dakota.

Radar Returns at 10:55 AM, Monday March 23, 2015
Radar Returns at 10:55 AM, Monday March 23, 2015

 

That next system will impact western North Dakota as an area of low pressure comes out of the Rocky Mountains and moves to the northeast.  It may start off as rain, but then turn to snow in the western part of the state.  The low will then track into northwestern Ontario that will bring the wrap-a-round moisture in the form of snow across northern North Dakota.  Again those areas too may start as rain, but be mainly snow.  Southeastern North Dakota where perhaps the least amount of precip will fall (as well as south central part of the state) will be a rain to snow mix.

Surface Map at 4:00 PM Tuesday
Surface Map at 4:00 PM Tuesday

 

Beyond this system, some normal March fluctuations in temperatures from cold to warm and back again, with next significant threat of snow holding off until perhaps around the first of April.

Daryl Ritchison